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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
are everywhere. we want to you remember this -- just last month, this new york city police officer made news by offering a homeless man in times square a pair of boots on a cold night. or this -- a tennessee boy who helped his brother in a wheelchair compete in a triathlon, helping him achieve his dream to cross a finish line. >>> or the football team at one arizona high school who protected this fresh han with special needs from bullies. and just this weekend, there's a texas cop who wrapped $100 bill in a traffic ticket he gave to one struggling dad. just one of the encouraging moments of humanity we have seen this year. it's important to keep in mind there's still good in the world even when tragic things happen. >>> what could prompt one to carry out such horrific acts, many questions will never be answered. we'll talk with an expert in criminal behavior. erin burnett joins us, next. sen. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male annou
with any fears that the children may have? dr. charles sew city a psychiatrist and medical director for the los angeles county department of children and family services. dr. sophie, thanks very much for coming in. so what's the most important thing parents can say or do to alleviate any concerns for these young kids? >> make sure their emotional responses are intact and their children don't become frightened. you need to have that discussion. talk to the children, ask them what they know. if they don't know anything, give them an education what happened. no gory details and then listen. the key is to listen to your children and then answer age appropriate lit questions. but answers less never sex more information and listen to your children. > how do parents make sure they don't project their own fears onto the kids? >> i think there's several ways this parents can protect themselves and not worry that they are going to put onto their children their own fears and concerns and these by talking to each other as parents, talking to other parents and making sure that they have at least
also saw the calendar as an opportunity. he opened a boutique hotel in the closest city. >> judging by a number of hotels being built in town and operators being created, we can tell there's a lot of expectation, a few hotels are giving discounts because it's the end of the world. >> some mayans have complained about the exploitation of their culture. but she says they are in the minority. >> what i have seen is they're very happy. they see the benefit because the nice thing about the tourism is that it shares the benefit with everyone. >> others disagree. alphonso runs tours to mayan communities and says the tourist dollars are going elsewhere. >> most of the money is spent in transportation, and they don't own taxes, hotels, restaurants, and here they don't have those services yet. >> yet may be the word. hotels across the five mayan states are nearly sold out. the hope is that interest in the culture is long-term. assuming everybody survives december 21st. >> nick, you still there? i was just -- i was just waiting -- >> reporter: basically we're looki ining at a situation tomo wh
in this town, sort of the sleepy new england town, about an hour north of new york city. >> about 60 miles or so, not far away from new york city as well, much closer to danbury, connecticut. david, hold on for a moment. mary snow is in newtown as well, outside the suspect's home, what are you seeing over there, mary? >> we're being kept far back from the suspect's home. the police have cordoned off this area. there are multiple law enforcement vehicles lined up and residents, wolf, are being kept away from their homes as well and looking at a car, a line of vehicles lined up of residents who are told they cannot go to their homes because police tape has been put up. and there are more than a dozen law enforcement vehicles here. >> the suspect, mary, now deceased, died at the scene, we don't know the circumstances surrounding that, ryan lanza, in his 20s. are you getting any information at all if he had a direct connection to the sandy hook elementary school, where this mass killing took place? >> not as yet. and i have to tell you, wolf, we approached some of the residents here. they're s
of ours who is a retired new york city police officer. he taught her how to shoot. she was very responsible with the gun. she was a very responsible person in general, especially in terms of safety. >> ellen, she took the boys to the shooting range. that's been talked about. she did take them to the shooting range? >> from what i understand, yep. >> and what did you want to say about that? >> again, i guess i want to j t just -- um -- um -- um -- um mickic russ as far as safety. nancy wouldn't answer her phone or look at a text in the car. if i got in the car, it was oops, seat belt, at the first dippi ding or before the ding happened. she was very careful and cautious and responsible. in regard to leaving anything out as far as a gun, it is -- i can't believe show with do the . >> sebastian, tell us your memories? >> a very dignified woman, a lot of class, very proper, great moral compass. we just saw her three weeks ago, my place, i left, accident say bye. she send embassy text zurngts say bye to me. the kind of person she was. very polite and nice to you, a really good perso
better all of our communities and all of our cities and all our states so we can make everyone everywhere in this country feel safe. thank you. i would be happy to answer any questions, as long as i see them to be within reason. [ inaudible question ] >> i was leaving to work, and she woke up before i left. and i've actually been teaching her portuguese. so our last conversation was in portuguese. and she told me good morning, and asked how i was doing. and i said that i was doing well. she said that she loved me. and i gave her a kiss and i was out the door. [ inaudible question ] >> the best way that i've been seeing that is i have two really good friends at home who have set up a facebook page to help raise money for emilie. and when i've gotten on that and just seen the number of people who have commented and expressed their condolences, it's been quite overwhelming. >> can you describe what your daughter looked like for us? >> there's lots of pictures on the emilieparker fund page on facebook. she was beautiful. she was blonde, always smiling. bright blue eyes. [ inaudible question ]
with mutual friend of ours who is a retired new york city police officer. so, you know, he taught her how to shoot, she was very responsible with the gun. she was very responsible person in general. especially in terms of safety. >> and she took the boys to the shooting range. that's been talked about. she did take them to the shooting range. >> from what i understand, yes. >> and what did you want to say about that? >> again, i guess i want to just mimic russ as far as her safety. nancy wouldn't even answer a phone or a text or even look at her text in the car. if i got in her car, it was oops, seat belt, at the first ding. or before the ding happened. so she was just very careful and cautious and responsible. and in regard to, you know, leaving anything out, as far as a gun, just -- i can't believe that she would do that. >> sebastian, what do you think? tell us about your memory. >> my memories of her, she was a very dignified woman. she had a lot of class. very proper. had a great moral compass. we just saw her, what, three weeks ago, my place, and i left and didn't say bye and she se
are in other cities are processing this, are going through this, and they need for us to reach out to them so the first and most important thing you can do stog find out what it is that they know about this trauma, what it is that they are thinking about, what it is that they would like to know, and then begin your discussion there instead of going into a straight dialogue or preaching to them as to what has happened and the evils of guns and so on. they may not be there yet. so be where they are, and begin that conversation with them. and secondly, and most importantly, it's not one conversation, don. you and i have talked about this before. it really is a series of conversations and it's not that you sit here and i'll sit there and let's talk, but it's about doing other activities, cooking with your kids, exercising with your kids, playing with your kids. and then bringing up these series of conversations and making sure it's interactional where they're doing a lot of the talking, you're doing a lot of the listening, but being honest with them and letting them know that this is something ve
from benghazi city. we're keen to attend near tripoli and to work actually closely with senior members of militias. this is the first time ever that we call for an international dialogue creating a venue, platform where all parts of libyan society will meet and discuss the challenges we're facing. it all has to do with creating an efficient judiciary system as well as a security system. >> sure. it sounds very encouraging. i know that's very significant for you. the consulate, the u.s. consulate that was attacked in benghazi, there are many libyans who took to the streets afterwards voicing support for the united states and the presence of the united states. do libyans still support the united states now? have their feelings changed about the role that americans have played? >> yes. actually, this was always there, and we've seen it ever since the liberation where hillary clinton and even president and condemn ran when they were in benghazi welcomed in the square. this was like a catalyst moment in the history when we came together for common values, democracy, and peace. so this kind
here. >> children in newtown and cities nearby are still off of school today, but for the rest of the country, school bells rang this morning. parents and teachers still struggling, probably going to struggle for a while now. how do they explain this mass shooting at an elementary school and whether or not this could even happen at their own child's school. here's what one dad said on friday. >> my kids are already asking, when is this going to happen again? you know, it was only a week ago that we were talking about this type of situation. and i said the chances of it happening are 1 in a zillion at sandy hook. i was wrong about that. >> i'm joined again from new york by clinical psychologist jeff gardere. and jeff, we might have to interrupt you if the white house briefing starts. >> sure. >> to go to that. but in the meantime, let's talk about this. what do you say? there are kids all over the country, they're getting bits and pieces of this story. they're probably afraid. they're probably very upset. how should parents communicate and reassure them that it's okay to go to s
york city. this is the story you are talking about. it involves the giants. they wore the letters shes. the most personal tribute, involved victor cruz. the favorite player of one of the murdered children. 6-year-old jack pinto. cruz has been in contact with the pinto family and he spoke following the game along with his head coach. let's listen. >> seem like a strong family. i spoke to -- spoke to the older brother and, you know, he was distraught as well. i told them to stay strong and i will do whatever i can to honor him. >> we felt terribly about it. i'm sure the whole nation does. it is not just us. but being close to home, it did -- the players were greatly upset about it. and -- many of the players have rung children. they can empathize parents of the young children killed. >> jack pinto's funeral is this afternoon. and according to victor cruz, the family is considering burying the child in cruz's jersey. >> will victor cruz go to the funeral? >> that's -- that was the plan. i would imagine if possible he is going to attend. >> just really heartbreaking. it really is. we are a
and create another image in its place. >> you're a former new york city police officer? >> that's correct. >> how did you prepare when you were a police officer for traumatic events like this? because, brooke baldwin has been talking to the rescuers and they are very emotional. they can't believe what they saw. so how did you prepare when you were doing that? >> it is not really something you can prepare for. and really it is the -- it is in the moment. you really don't have that opportunity to deal -- to express your emotions at that -- in that moment in time. it is only afterwards really you have a chance to process it. >> i understand that yesterday you met with grief counselors at various schools. >> at the grieving center, yes. >> at the grieving center. tell us about that. >> basically i donated some books there so they had the opportunity to use that with the kids in being able to, as a tool for them to use the book that can help them cope with what's been going on. >> it is important to be here because -- >> it is important to be here. it is important, i think, to find out how you
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)